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Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ., 3 October 2001
Vol. 2001, Issue 1, p. dn1
[DOI: 10.1126/sageke.2001.1.dn1]

NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASE CASE STUDIES

Cortical Basal Ganglionic Degeneration

Nikolaos Scarmeas, Steven S. Chin, and Karen Marder

The authors are at the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia University, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Department of Neurology, Cognitive Neuroscience Division of the Taub Institute for Research on Alzheimer's Disease and the Aging Brain, the Sergievsky Center, and the Department of Pathology, New York, NY 12345, USA. E-mail: ns257{at}columbia.edu (N.S.)

http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/sageke;2001/1/dn1

Abstract: In this case study, we describe the symptoms, neuropsychological testing, and brain pathology of a retired mason's assistant with cortical basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). CBGD is an extremely rare neurodegenerative disease that is categorized under both Parkinsonian syndromes and frontal lobe dementias. It affects men and women nearly equally, and the age of onset is usually in the sixth decade of life. CBGD is characterized by Parkinson's-like motor symptoms and by deficits of movement and cognition, indicating focal brain pathology. Neuronal cell loss is ultimately responsible for the neurological symptoms.

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Science of Aging Knowledge Environment. ISSN 1539-6150