Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ., 30 April 2003
Vol. 2003, Issue 17, p. nf8
[DOI: 10.1126/sageke.2003.17.nf8]

NEWS FOCUS

The Accidental Biologist

Geneticist Eugenia Wang crossed the Pacific from Taiwan to forge a life for herself in the world of science

Ingfei Chen

http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/sageke;2003/17/nf8

Abstract: Eugenia Wang's career represents a string of dogged, hard-earned achievements in transcending differences in gender, ethnicity, language, and culture. An authority on the study of programmed cell death and aging, Wang is a cell biologist at the University of Louisville School of Medicine in Kentucky, where she is starting up the future Gheens Center for Aging and Age-Related Diseases. She co-organized the Gordon Research Conference on the biology of aging in March 2003 and has coordinated National Institute on Aging-sponsored workshops on senescence. Her colleagues say she's earned a reputation as a hard-driving scientist with high standards, yet she's warm and caring as well. One can't help wondering how Wang does it all--have a family, run a lab, and handle all her administrative tasks. Her secrets include a supportive spouse, a can-do attitude, and people-managing skills that she gleaned from reading the biographies of military leaders.

Citation: I. Chen, The Accidental Biologist. Sci. SAGE KE 2003, nf8 (30 April 2003)
http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/sageke;2003/17/nf8

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