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Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ., 10 March 2004
Vol. 2004, Issue 10, p. pe10
[DOI: 10.1126/sageke.2004.10.pe10]

PERSPECTIVES

To Age or Not to Age--What Is the Question?

Troy Day

The author is in the Departments of Mathematics and Biology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 Canada. E-mail: tday{at}mast.queensu.ca

http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2004/10/pe10

Key Words: antagonistic pleiotropy • mutation accumulation • evolution • senescence

Abstract: Over the past 50 years, a generally accepted theory about the evolution of aging has been developed. One common conclusion that has been deduced from this theory is that aging is inevitable in organisms in which there is a difference between offspring and parents. A recent paper by Sozou and Seymour questions this prediction using a mathematical model, but it remains to be seen whether their new results stand up to more general analysis.

Citation: T. Day, To Age or Not to Age--What Is the Question? Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ. 2004 (10), pe10 (2004).

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Science of Aging Knowledge Environment. ISSN 1539-6150