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Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ., 4 August 2004
Vol. 2004, Issue 31, p. re5
[DOI: 10.1126/sageke.2004.31.re5]

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Murine Models of Life Span Extension

Jason K. Quarrie, and Karl T. Riabowol

The authors are in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at the University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada, T2N 4N1. E-mail: karl{at}ucalgary.ca (K.T.R.)

http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2004/31/re5

Key Words: life span extension • mouse models • growth hormone • insulin-like growth factor • oxidative damage • caloric restriction

Abstract: Mice are excellent experimental models for genetic research and are being used to investigate the genetic component of organismal aging. Several mutant mice are known to possess defects in the growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor 1 (GH/IGF-1) neurohormonal pathway and exhibit dwarfism together with extended life span. Their phenotypes resemble those of mice subjected to caloric restriction. Targeted mutations that affect components of this pathway, including the GH receptor, p66Shc, and the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), also extend life span; mutations that affect IGF-1R or downstream components of the pathway decouple longevity effects from dwarfism. These effects on life span may result from an increased capacity to resist oxidative damage.

Citation: J. K. Quarrie, K. T. Riabowol, Murine Models of Life Span Extension. Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ. 2004 (31), re5 (2004).

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