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Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ., 1 September 2004
Vol. 2004, Issue 35, p. ns7
[DOI: 10.1126/sageke.2004.35.ns7]

NEWS SYNTHESIS

Déjà Vu

The history of in vitro fertilization could offer insights into how the controversy over the use of human embryos for stem cell research might play out

Ingfei Chen

http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2004/35/ns7

Abstract: Embryonic stem cells have the potential to turn into any type of cell, perhaps someday providing a way to replace tissues harmed by age-related and other diseases. But the complex ethical questions that swirl around this area of research--which requires the destruction of early embryos--are not new. The moral and philosophical issues in the stem cell debate trace their roots to the controversy over in vitro fertilization in the years surrounding the birth of the first "test tube baby" in 1978.

Citation: I. Chen, Déjà Vu. Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ. 2004 (35), ns7 (2004).

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Science of Aging Knowledge Environment. ISSN 1539-6150