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Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ., 29 June 2005
Vol. 2005, Issue 26, p. nf50
[DOI: 10.1126/sageke.2005.26.nf50]

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How Can We Craft a Better Theory to Explain the Evolution of Aging?

Science's 125th anniversary special issue

Mitch Leslie

http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2005/26/nf50

Abstract: The leading evolutionary explanation for senescence has hit middle age. Born in the late 1940s, the theory matured in the 1960s and flourished in the following decades, as researchers amassed evidence supporting its predictions. But like many of its contemporaries, the theory now needs to have a little work done. Evolution experts don't envision a makeover, merely a few nips and tucks to explain some vexing results from field studies and mathematical models.

Citation: M. Leslie, How Can We Craft a Better Theory to Explain the Evolution of Aging? Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ. 2005 (26), nf50 (2005).

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Science of Aging Knowledge Environment. ISSN 1539-6150