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Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ., 17 August 2005
Vol. 2005, Issue 33, p. pe25
[DOI: 10.1126/sageke.2005.33.pe25]

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Making Young Tumors Old: A New Weapon Against Cancer?

Julien Sage

The author is at Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford CA 94305, USA. E-mail: julsage{at}stanford.edu.

http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2005/33/pe25

Key Words: senescence • cancer • tumor • oncogene • p53 • Ras

Abstract: As the population of industrial nations ages, the incidence of cancer and cancer mortality is increasing. Intuitively, older organisms may be less able to cope with accumulated damage and thus be more prone to develop cancer. However, so far, the links between aging and cancer have been only partially explored. Strikingly, four recent studies now indicate that premature senescence accompanied by cell cycle arrest occurs in tumors initiated by an oncogenic mutation. Thus, senescence may act as a key tumor suppressor mechanism in young tumors in vivo.

Citation: J. Sage, Making Young Tumors Old: A New Weapon Against Cancer? Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ. 2005 (33), pe25 (2005).

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THIS ARTICLE HAS BEEN CITED BY OTHER ARTICLES:
Cancer Suppression at Old Age.
C. Harding, F. Pompei, E. E. Lee, and R. Wilson (2008)
Cancer Res. 68, 4465-4478
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