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Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ., 28 June 2006
Vol. 2006, Issue 10, p. pe17
[DOI: 10.1126/sageke.2006.10.pe17]

PERSPECTIVES

Developing a Research Agenda in Biogerontology: Physiological Systems

Jill L. Carrington, and Francis L. Bellino

The authors are in the Biology of Aging Program at the National Institute on Aging, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA. E-mail: carringtonj{at}nia.nih.gov (J.L.C.)

http://sageke.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2006/10/pe17

Key Words: prostate • ovary • testis • kidney • bone • skeletal muscle • stem cells • oxidative stress • cellular senescence • apoptosis • grant funding • aging-related research priorities

Abstract: The Biology of Aging Program (BAP) at the National Institute on Aging supports research in many areas, including processes of cell senescence and apoptosis, genetic influences on aging, and how aging leads to tissue dysfunction. Several approaches to research on aging physiological systems are described, along with BAP programmatic efforts to enhance and support that research. Understanding the relation between aging and tissue dysfunction has led to new insights into how health can be improved for aged individuals.

Citation: J. L. Carrington, F. L. Bellino, Developing a Research Agenda in Biogerontology: Physiological Systems. Sci. Aging Knowl. Environ. 2006 (10), pe17 (2006).

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Science of Aging Knowledge Environment. ISSN 1539-6150